Home Insulation Basics: How to Survive a New England Winter

Posted by Wattson on Jan 26, 2017

home insulation basics

New England weathers have always been pretty rough in comparison to the rest of the country. Not to mention this year we can expect the return of the Polar Vortex. With sub-zero temperatures on their way, it’s only natural to want to stay home and wait until warmer weather is upon us. Too bad many homeowners in Worcester County don’t have a properly insulated home. Learn more about home insulation basics for winter weather and what to do if your home needs additional padding.

Proper insulation is crucial during the winter because…

Your heating bill goes through the roof.

And so is your heat. As you may know, heat rises and a poorly insulated attic may be the reason why you find yourself constantly upping your thermostat every winter. Homes in Massachusetts are legally required to have insulation, but builders don’t often go above and beyond the minimum requirements. Does your home feel drafty? Have you noticed that rooms with two or more outside-facing walls are colder than the rest of your home? Warm air may be leaking out of your home through cracks and gaps in your insulation without you even knowing.

Your home experiences “frost quakes.”

It’s a quiet night and you’re curled up in bed, perusing the latest happenings on Facebook. All of a sudden, you hear what sounds like a gunshot. Has someone broken into your home? Most likely not. It’s probably a “frost quake,” a loud noise that is caused by the difference between your home’s internal and external temperature. This commonly occurs in people’s attics, decks, and piping when it’s very cold outside. There’s usually nothing to worry about, but cold days like these (think: below zero temperatures) can be problematic. Avoid frozen pipes by insulating your home properly.

Your home is more prone to ice dams after winter storms.

Long story short, ice dams are formed when the temperature of your roof is inconsistent. Imaging snow on the slope of your roof melts, only to trickle to the edge where the roof is colder, causing ice to form. Slabs of ice along your roofline can melt, risking running water making its way into your home, damaging walls, ceilings, and more. And while icicles make your home look like a winter wonderland, you’ll be wondering why you didn’t insulate your home better this winter.

Cracks may open up in your walls or ceilings.

What happens when you don’t insulate your attic properly? Water damage. Cracks can open up, causing structural damage, and quite possibly a nasty mold infestation.

How do I know if my home has an insulation problem?

We recommend getting a professional’s opinion. A no-cost Mass Save home energy audit will spot any problem areas in your home. Not to worry – we don’t point out your home’s flaws and then leave you high and dry. If your home has air leakage problems, our technicians can assist you with air sealing.

schedule mass save home energy audit

My home needs insulation. What do I do next?

Energy Monster is one of the leading home insulation contractors in Worcester County because we care about homeowners. Making the most of the Mass Save program can be difficult, so we do everything we can to walk you through the process. Our trained technicians will let you know:

  • Where your home needs insulation. Pro tip: if your attic needs it, try to get that addressed right away to avoid ice dams from forming.
  • What kind of insulation you need. Cellulose? Fiberglass? Blown or batt? Find out which type will work best for your home and insulation needs.
  • How much insulation you need. Not all areas of your home have the same insulation requirements. For example, your attic requires a much higher R-value than your outside walls.
  • How much it will cost. This depends on a variety of factors including the type and the amount needed.
  • How you can save on your insulation installation with Mass Save rebates, like the 0% Interest Mass Save HEAT Loan.
Return to Blog

Search

Privacy guaranteed. We never share your info.





New Call-to-action



Get Started
Please select state first to proceed further in the site.